System Events?

Event hooks allow you to integrate your custom programming into various places of Bonfire’s execution, without having to modify the core code. Because this is aimed squarely at the developer, and not the end user, there is no GUI to manage this functionality. Instead, registering events is done by modifying a config file.

Why Not Use Hooks?

CodeIgniter’s hooks are a great feature, but they don’t always provide enough flexibility. There is no documentation on how to create your own hooks (though it’s not that tough), and it lacks the ability to pass any dynamic parameters to the hook. For a modular system like Bonfire, hooks don’t provide any transparent method to support multiple modules.

That’s what System Events aim to solve.

Extending The Core

Bonfire’s core provides a number of hooks integrated into the system that you can tap into to modify the behavior or data without modifying the core code itself. You tell Bonfire that you want to respond to certain events by creating a class/method and editing the config/events.php file with the name of the hook and the information where to find the code to run. The code can live in any module’s library or controller that you choose.

2.1 Registering An Event

To take an action whenever a new user is created in the system, like creating some new data specific to your module, you would first create a method in your class’ controller to handle this. For this example, we have chosen to add a setup_defaults() method in our my_module controller, but it could have been in a library just as easily.

php public function setup_defaults($user_id) { ... }

We know that the payload the event provides is the id of the user, so we capture that in the first parameter. At this point, we could use the user_model to retrieve the user, or save some new settings just for this user, etc.

The next step is to register our event in the configuration file. Open up application/config/events.php and add a new $config array.

php $config['after_create_user'][] = array( 'module' => 'my_module', 'filepath' => 'controllers', 'filename' => 'my_module.php', 'class' => 'My_module', 'method' => 'setup_defaults' );

The following parameters are all required within the config array:

Most system events will deliver a payload. This will typically be an array of data that the event allows you to operate on. Each payload will be described in the event descriptions below.

Core Events

The following table lists all events within the core of Bonfire that are available for you to access.

Controllers

Event Description
before_controller Called prior to the controller constructor being ran. Payload is the name of the current controller.
after_controller_constructor Called just after the controller constructor is ran, but prior to the method being ran. Payload is the name of the current controller.

Templates and Pages

Event Descrpription
after_page_render Called just after the main view is rendered. Payload is the view’s output.
after_layout_render Called just after the entire page is rendered. Payload is the current output.
after_block_render Called just after the block is rendered. Payload is an array with ‘block’ being the name of the block and ‘output’ being the rendered block’s output.

Users

Event Description
after_login Called after successful login. Payload is an array of user_id and role_id.
before_logout Called just before logging the user out. Payload is an array of user_id and role_id.
after_create_user Called after a user is created. Payload is the new user’s id.
before_user_update Called just prior to updating a user. Payload is an array of user_id and ‘data’, where data is all of the update information passed into the method. Note: user_id may be an array if the user_model’s update() method is called with an array as the first parameter. In this case, the user’s ID may not be in the array…
after_user_update Called just after updating a user. Payload is an array of user_id and ‘data’, where data is all of the update information passed into the method. Note: user_id may be an array if the user_model’s update() method is called with an array as the first parameter. In this case, the user’s ID may not be in the array…

Using Events In Your Modules

You can use events in your own modules to provide places for other modules to hook into. It is very simple and only requires that you use a single line of code in your library, model, or controller wherever you would like the hook to fire.

php Events::trigger('event_name', $payload);

The function takes two parameters.

The first parameter is the name of the event to call. You may use any name that you want, so long as it doesn’t conflict with an existing event name. To avoid collisions, it is recommended that you prefix your event name with the name of your module, like forums.after_comment.

The second parameter is a single variable that contains the payload that you wish to provide to the event responders. This could be an ID, an array with multiple pieces of data, or anything else that is appropriate to your needs.